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EnvirocycleTM Composter / ComposteamakerTM - General Information

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a process of transforming organic matter into humus under specific conditions. It speeds up the natural process by using a varied mixture of organic matter with ideal conditions, thus allowing large numbers of microorganisms to thrive and transform the organic matter into humus. Compost is the foundation of organic fertilization. It improves soil structure by making it light and porous. It contributes some minerals but mainly releases the minerals that naturally occur in soil, making them more readily available to plants. Flowers and vegetables become stronger, more vigorous and more disease-resistant.

Why Compost?
Compost provides an excellent alternative to commercial chemical fertilizers, which disturb the natural balance of the soil. By composting, we can reduce our volume of household waste by about 30% and make a responsible contribution to sound waste management.

Traditional Composting vs Rotating Composting with EnvirocycleTM
Composting is sometimes described as an art or a science. In fact, to succeed in making good compost in a compost pile or a traditional container, you need a certain amount of practical experience. City dwellers have neither the time, space, nor the tools to practice this method. The EnvirocycleTM Composter/ComposteamakerTM was designed to facilitate the process. With its rotating design, the EnvirocycleTM Composter/ ComposteamakerTM, composting is almost effortless in your backyard, balcony, terrace, or garden.

Composting Process
When a sufficient quantity of organic material has been collected, the composting process begins. It continues for a period that varies according to the nature of the materials used and the conditions created. The process can be divided into four phases, according to the temperature present at different times. Four main stages in decomposition of compost:
FRESH: At this stage, the materials being composed are dark in color and still easily recognizable; micro‐organisms are sparse and just beginning their activity; a rise in temperature can be observed ‐ this is the heat phase.
 

PARTIALLY DECOMPOSED:
At this stage, the compost has a mild odor and contains many micro‐organisms. The materials being composted are very loose and brittle, and almost unrecognizable; mushroom may be present, aiding to decompose the most resistant materials: cellulose, lignin, and wood. Chemical exchange takes placeduring this stage ‐ this is the gaseous and liquid phase.
 

MATURE:
At this stage, recombination of decomposition products from preceding stages occurs ‐ this is the humidification phase.

AGED COMPOST:
At this stage, the compost looks almost like soil (loam); it resembles natural topsoil. Organic matter and nitrogen content are low ‐ this is the mineralization phase. In reality, the four phases overlap, but there is always one that predominates, depending on the length of time composting and the types of materials used. Quoted from R.J.A.E. ʺLe respect de lʹéquilibre naturelʺ May 1989.

Materials to Use:
Essentially the materials added in the composter will be two types: moist and dry. The composting process works best when the organic pieces are small. Wet / GREEN: Moist composting materials include garden waste (non‐perennials), fruit and vegetable peels, tea bags, coffee grinds (complete with filter papers), table waste, egg shells, peanut shells, plant trimmings ‐ all are high nitrogen materials that will feed the microbes a rich diet. Dry / BROWN: Dry materials are things like hay, straw, fallen twigs, dry grass clippings, (Leave the mown grass on the lawn for a day before collecting to allow it to dry out enough ‐ fresh grass added in the composter tends to compact and not rot as quickly as other materials.) sawdust, all kinds of tissue paper, newspaper (shredded), paper and cartons (shredded), egg cartons (shredded). Kitchen and garden wastes are excellent composting materials, with certain exceptions.

These two categories should be avoided:
• Paper and cardboard may be used in limited quantities; however it would be preferable to recycle them through a collection program if one is available in your neighborhood.  Excrement may contain pathogens that are difficult to eliminate during domestic composting; it is better not to add it to a composting container.

Important Parameters
Essentially the materials added in the composter will be two types: moist and dry. The composting process works best when the organic pieces are small. Composting is a natural process through which organic material is converted into a soil‐like product called compost or humus. The process works with the
 

AERATION, MOISTURE
Moisture and aeration during composting are inversely proportional. The more
water there is, the less air, and vice versa. There must be enough aeration to ensure aerobic decomposition. Many more micro‐organisms flourish in the presence of air. Proper aeration also eliminates the risk of unpleasant odors. Moisture content hould be between 50% and 60%, about as damp as a sponge that has been wet and squeezed out. TIME AND TEMPERATURE
The more heat compost generates the faster it decomposes. If you use an equal blend of brown and green materials, reduce the size of materials to be composted and provide adequate moisture and air, you will then create a hot, fast compost.

 C/N RATIO
Organic matter contains varying proportions of carbon and nitrogen. In general, dry materials such as dead leaves, straw, strips of cut newspaper, sawdust or earth are very rich in carbon, while moist materials such as kitchen wastes and grass clippings contain a fair amount of nitrogen. The proportion of carbon and nitrogen is very important for proper composting. If there is too much material rich in carbon (dry), composting will take place very gradually. Conversely, if there is too much nitrogen‐rich (moist) material, decomposition will be very rapid, but there is a risk of odor, since the excess nitrogen will be given off as ammonia. The ideal C/N ratio is 30/1. However, it is not necessary to do any complicated calculations to come out the right proportion. What you need to know is that dry materials should always be mixed with moist materials. If the compost does not decompose, there is too much carbon; if there is an odor, add some dry materials.

How to Use Your Compost
Compost can be used throughout the yard, in the vegetable garden, in the flower beds, on the lawn (if it has been sifted), under trees and hedges, etc. The lawn and most ornamental plants will benefit from mature compost that resembles topsoil. In the vegetable garden, the needs of different vegetables vary a great deal. The ʺcomposteaʺ, also known as compost tea or liquid fertilizer, can be used for indoor plants, gardens and lawns. The compostea is very concentrated and needs to be diluted 1/10 with water (1 part of compostea with 10 parts of water).

Visit http://www.barnyardproducts.com/compost/bin/can/tumbler

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EnvirocycleTM Composter / ComposteamakerTM - General Information

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a process of transforming organic matter into humus under specific conditions. It speeds up the natural process by using a varied mixture of organic matter with ideal conditions, thus allowing large numbers of microorganisms to thrive and transform the organic matter into humus. Compost is the foundation of organic fertilization. It improves soil structure by making it light and porous. It contributes some minerals but mainly releases the minerals that naturally occur in soil, making them more readily available to plants. Flowers and vegetables become stronger, more vigorous and more disease-resistant.

Why Compost?
Compost provides an excellent alternative to commercial chemical fertilizers, which disturb the natural balance of the soil. By composting, we can reduce our volume of household waste by about 30% and make a responsible contribution to sound waste management.

Traditional Composting vs Rotating Composting with EnvirocycleTM
Composting is sometimes described as an art or a science. In fact, to succeed in making good compost in a compost pile or a traditional container, you need a certain amount of practical experience. City dwellers have neither the time, space, nor the tools to practice this method. The EnvirocycleTM Composter/ComposteamakerTM was designed to facilitate the process. With its rotating design, the EnvirocycleTM Composter/ ComposteamakerTM, composting is almost effortless in your backyard, balcony, terrace, or garden.

Composting Process
When a sufficient quantity of organic material has been collected, the composting process begins. It continues for a period that varies according to the nature of the materials used and the conditions created. The process can be divided into four phases, according to the temperature present at different times. Four main stages in decomposition of compost:
FRESH: At this stage, the materials being composed are dark in color and still easily recognizable; micro‐organisms are sparse and just beginning their activity; a rise in temperature can be observed ‐ this is the heat phase.
 

PARTIALLY DECOMPOSED:
At this stage, the compost has a mild odor and contains many micro‐organisms. The materials being composted are very loose and brittle, and almost unrecognizable; mushroom may be present, aiding to decompose the most resistant materials: cellulose, lignin, and wood. Chemical exchange takes placeduring this stage ‐ this is the gaseous and liquid phase.
 

MATURE:
At this stage, recombination of decomposition products from preceding stages occurs ‐ this is the humidification phase.

AGED COMPOST:
At this stage, the compost looks almost like soil (loam); it resembles natural topsoil. Organic matter and nitrogen content are low ‐ this is the mineralization phase. In reality, the four phases overlap, but there is always one that predominates, depending on the length of time composting and the types of materials used. Quoted from R.J.A.E. ʺLe respect de lʹéquilibre naturelʺ May 1989.

Materials to Use:
Essentially the materials added in the composter will be two types: moist and dry. The composting process works best when the organic pieces are small. Wet / GREEN: Moist composting materials include garden waste (non‐perennials), fruit and vegetable peels, tea bags, coffee grinds (complete with filter papers), table waste, egg shells, peanut shells, plant trimmings ‐ all are high nitrogen materials that will feed the microbes a rich diet. Dry / BROWN: Dry materials are things like hay, straw, fallen twigs, dry grass clippings, (Leave the mown grass on the lawn for a day before collecting to allow it to dry out enough ‐ fresh grass added in the composter tends to compact and not rot as quickly as other materials.) sawdust, all kinds of tissue paper, newspaper (shredded), paper and cartons (shredded), egg cartons (shredded). Kitchen and garden wastes are excellent composting materials, with certain exceptions.

These two categories should be avoided:
• Paper and cardboard may be used in limited quantities; however it would be preferable to recycle them through a collection program if one is available in your neighborhood.  Excrement may contain pathogens that are difficult to eliminate during domestic composting; it is better not to add it to a composting container.

Important Parameters
Essentially the materials added in the composter will be two types: moist and dry. The composting process works best when the organic pieces are small. Composting is a natural process through which organic material is converted into a soil‐like product called compost or humus. The process works with the
 

AERATION, MOISTURE
Moisture and aeration during composting are inversely proportional. The more
water there is, the less air, and vice versa. There must be enough aeration to ensure aerobic decomposition. Many more micro‐organisms flourish in the presence of air. Proper aeration also eliminates the risk of unpleasant odors. Moisture content hould be between 50% and 60%, about as damp as a sponge that has been wet and squeezed out. TIME AND TEMPERATURE
The more heat compost generates the faster it decomposes. If you use an equal blend of brown and green materials, reduce the size of materials to be composted and provide adequate moisture and air, you will then create a hot, fast compost.

 C/N RATIO
Organic matter contains varying proportions of carbon and nitrogen. In general, dry materials such as dead leaves, straw, strips of cut newspaper, sawdust or earth are very rich in carbon, while moist materials such as kitchen wastes and grass clippings contain a fair amount of nitrogen. The proportion of carbon and nitrogen is very important for proper composting. If there is too much material rich in carbon (dry), composting will take place very gradually. Conversely, if there is too much nitrogen‐rich (moist) material, decomposition will be very rapid, but there is a risk of odor, since the excess nitrogen will be given off as ammonia. The ideal C/N ratio is 30/1. However, it is not necessary to do any complicated calculations to come out the right proportion. What you need to know is that dry materials should always be mixed with moist materials. If the compost does not decompose, there is too much carbon; if there is an odor, add some dry materials.

How to Use Your Compost
Compost can be used throughout the yard, in the vegetable garden, in the flower beds, on the lawn (if it has been sifted), under trees and hedges, etc. The lawn and most ornamental plants will benefit from mature compost that resembles topsoil. In the vegetable garden, the needs of different vegetables vary a great deal. The ʺcomposteaʺ, also known as compost tea or liquid fertilizer, can be used for indoor plants, gardens and lawns. The compostea is very concentrated and needs to be diluted 1/10 with water (1 part of compostea with 10 parts of water).

Visit http://www.barnyardproducts.com/compost/bin/can/tumbler

Leave a comment...

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