Blog - News

Fall is the Time to Plant Pasture Grasses

Pasture Grasses can supply a good yield of quality feed for all livestock. In order to obtain a good pasture you must have good pasture grasses. There are several grasses that work well in most pastures. They include Perennial Ryegrass, Intermediate Ryegrass, Orchard Grass, Red Clover, Ladino Clover, Alfalfa, and Timothy, just to name a few.


Below is information about these types of pasture grasses:


Perennial Ryegrass and Intermediate Ryegrass are considered bunch type grasses, establish rapidly and have a high forage value. Ryegrasses are an excellent cover crop and they work best when mixed with red clover and other grasses. However, they do not hold up well in cold weather which prevents their use for long term forage production.


Orchard Grass is a bunch type grass which adapts to a wide range of soils that maintain moisture. This type of grass is ideal for frequent grazing and haying and establishes easier than most cool season grasses. It is a good choice if you are planning to over seed an existing pasture using a no-till drill method. Orchard Grassed do not fair well in heat and drought.


Red Clover establishes easily and has shade tolerance and contributes to adding nitrogen. Red Clover is best used as a cover crop or planted with other pasture grass seed mixes. Per year, Red Clover usually produces 2-3 hay crops. It can be no-till seeded and it is grown mainly throughout the Northern United States.


Ladino Clover also known as white clover, likes cool moist soils. It is moderately winter hardy. Ladino Clover is good at helping re-establishment of legumes in predominantly grass sods and performs best when mixed with other pasture grasses.


Alfalfa is a perennial crop and should be planted in the spring or the fall. It is important that these seeds be planted close to the surface of the soil because they are so small. Because the seedlings are weak they must be protected from weeds. But after developing, alfalfa plants are hearty and will re-grow many times after being cut for hay.


Timothy is another bunch type grass and likes cool moist soils. Timothy has good winter hardiness but is very sensitive to drought and heat. Timothy is not good for long term grazing. When grazing it is best to wait until the plants are 10 inches tall and stop grazing when plant is about 4 inches. It is also best if the plant is mixed with other grasses such as red clover.


An important factor in selecting your pasture grass seeds is to choose one with High Sugar Grass (HSG).  High Sugar Grass was developed for those who want to get the most out of their fields.  The high sugar reserve in the grasses makes them tolerant to all types of temperatures. They will also re-grow quickly after grazing and will help keep down weeds.  HSG’s are also proven to increase livestock output.
In conclusion, it is very important to select the correct type of pasture grass seeds for your type of soil and the best pasture grass mix for your livestock. Becoming familiar with the many different types is a good place to start. Do some more research and check with your local agriculture extension office in your area.

Leave a comment...

Blog

Fall is the Time to Plant Pasture Grasses

Pasture Grasses can supply a good yield of quality feed for all livestock. In order to obtain a good pasture you must have good pasture grasses. There are several grasses that work well in most pastures. They include Perennial Ryegrass, Intermediate Ryegrass, Orchard Grass, Red Clover, Ladino Clover, Alfalfa, and Timothy, just to name a few.


Below is information about these types of pasture grasses:


Perennial Ryegrass and Intermediate Ryegrass are considered bunch type grasses, establish rapidly and have a high forage value. Ryegrasses are an excellent cover crop and they work best when mixed with red clover and other grasses. However, they do not hold up well in cold weather which prevents their use for long term forage production.


Orchard Grass is a bunch type grass which adapts to a wide range of soils that maintain moisture. This type of grass is ideal for frequent grazing and haying and establishes easier than most cool season grasses. It is a good choice if you are planning to over seed an existing pasture using a no-till drill method. Orchard Grassed do not fair well in heat and drought.


Red Clover establishes easily and has shade tolerance and contributes to adding nitrogen. Red Clover is best used as a cover crop or planted with other pasture grass seed mixes. Per year, Red Clover usually produces 2-3 hay crops. It can be no-till seeded and it is grown mainly throughout the Northern United States.


Ladino Clover also known as white clover, likes cool moist soils. It is moderately winter hardy. Ladino Clover is good at helping re-establishment of legumes in predominantly grass sods and performs best when mixed with other pasture grasses.


Alfalfa is a perennial crop and should be planted in the spring or the fall. It is important that these seeds be planted close to the surface of the soil because they are so small. Because the seedlings are weak they must be protected from weeds. But after developing, alfalfa plants are hearty and will re-grow many times after being cut for hay.


Timothy is another bunch type grass and likes cool moist soils. Timothy has good winter hardiness but is very sensitive to drought and heat. Timothy is not good for long term grazing. When grazing it is best to wait until the plants are 10 inches tall and stop grazing when plant is about 4 inches. It is also best if the plant is mixed with other grasses such as red clover.


An important factor in selecting your pasture grass seeds is to choose one with High Sugar Grass (HSG).  High Sugar Grass was developed for those who want to get the most out of their fields.  The high sugar reserve in the grasses makes them tolerant to all types of temperatures. They will also re-grow quickly after grazing and will help keep down weeds.  HSG’s are also proven to increase livestock output.
In conclusion, it is very important to select the correct type of pasture grass seeds for your type of soil and the best pasture grass mix for your livestock. Becoming familiar with the many different types is a good place to start. Do some more research and check with your local agriculture extension office in your area.

Leave a comment...

Why Barnyard Products.Com

Experience- We have over 30 years combine experience with farm and ranch supply including operation of a family farm, Distribution Company, and we enjoy hobby gardening. 

Premium Quality- We do not sell any product that we have not personally tested and used. From quality farm and ranch supply to the best lawn and garden supply tools available.

Selection- We carry a small line of farm supplies and gardening supplies, most of them made in the USA. You never need to look elsewhere for premium farm supply and gardening tools.

Easy Ordering- Order on-line, by Phone, Fax, or Snail Mail.  

Premium Customer Service- We back up everything we sell with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. 

We are just a phone call away: 877.856.3062 or email us:  info@barnyardproducts.com

 


Copyright © Barnyard Products.com Sidney, OH
info@barnyardproducts.com
Bookmark and Share